Rule 530

We have a last minute appointment, are you familiar with Hamilton?

(By the way, just to head off the CPC discussion that has already started on social media, no I did not interpret for Hamilton. I did, however, go to it with my family and it was AWESOME!)

Note from Uncle Dale: Millie Continues to ROCK!

A Quiet Place is here!

97% on Rotten Tomatoes.

Number one movie in the country and Millie is getting fantastic reviews.

There is a reason she is! The movie is great and she is AWESOME!

Most important, HOLY COW IT’S A SCARY MOVIE. It is like nothing you have EVER seen. You spend the whole movie on the edge of your seat… listening, oh and holding your breath.

If you have anxiety MED UP before you go!

I am teaching a class this semester called “Visual Linguistic Analysis.” The purpose of the class is to analyze how prosody impacts meaning in ASL (anyone who is fluent can tell you what was said, the skill of an interpreter is being able to discuss why you know). One of the points of analysis we discuss is genres of discourse. One of the genres is “Deaf Gain” or “because I’m Deaf I win.” This movie speaks to Deaf Gain at a level so subtle and in such an imbedded manner that I have not decided for myself if it was on purpose. In the end, who cares! Millie carries the Deaf Gain off with a skill that is frankly stunning.

The funniest thing to me is the main criticism I am seeing is the thing I loved about it; it tells you nothing that the characters would not know. The movie wastes no time explaining why, where or how. I just allows you to watch what the characters do.

I would say “run do walk” but don’t run, just stay on the sand so they don’t hear you, and get to A Quiet Place.

WAIT! WAIT!!! READY?

Took my kids to see A Quiet Place in a very quiet theatre!

I can’t wait to see where Millie goes next!

https://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_5ac94beae4b07a3485e5539e

Note from Uncle Dale: Uncle Dale at NAD

Hi. So my friends what are your plans this summer?

I know, I know, you are looking out your window and thinking, “summer? You’re kidding right??” With the Nor’easter (what is it now?? Round Four?) right outside your door, summer feels a thousand years away. But you’ve got to have plans for the sun or you’ll never survive the snow!

I have been asked to give several workshops this summer and I will make some announcements of times and dates as the details are finalized.

My last Zaboosh workshop was Saturday March 17, 2018 (I will wear green).

But, as the title of this Note says, I am thrilled to announce that I will be presenting this summer at the NAD Biennial Convention in Hartford Connecticut July 3-7, 2018.

I am so excited to be going back east to my heart’s home!

In 1994 I spent a fantastic summer at the Mill in Chester Connecticut attending the summer program for The National Theatre of the Deaf. This was a life changing experience learning at the feet of Bernard Bragg, Adrian Blue, Camille Jeter, Shanny Mow, Andy Vasnick, Sandi Inches and so many other giants. I built friendships that summer that I treasure (those of you who wonder if Anthony Natale could really be as kind and supportive as he seems, the answer is yes. He is a beautiful person, inside and out). I plan to sneak away for a couple of hours and walk the streets of Chester once again.

NAD is a combined conference with RID Region I, so I hope to see my Boston family turn out! I miss you all daily! I mean it when I say family.

My workshop will be a “tour” of federal laws set up as if each were a different country. We will learn the “history and culture” of each law. It’s a blast! I hope to see you there!

See the Sights: A Tour of Federal Laws

Dale H Boam Esq.

Civil Rights & Legal Advocacy

Workshop Abstract:

Federal Laws such as the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (504) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act are complex and confusing. It is vital for both persons who are Deaf and Interpreters to understand the differences and similarities between, and even within, these laws. Its vital to know the authorities through which each was passed in order to know which law applies to any specific situation, how a complaint is filed, what is and is not evidence of a violation and what remedies may be available if a violation is proven. There are so many differences it can be hard to keep it all straight! This workshop is presented as a “tour” of the laws as if each was its own country. “Uncle Dale Tours” lays each out like a map of a foreign land and the participants walk though each, see the sights and landmarks unique to each as well as their shared heritage. Each are issued a passport with certain knowledge points needed to earn a “visa” to the next law. Its equally fun and beneficial for the interpreter and community member.

Workshop Partner:

General

Workshop Presenters:

Dale H Boam

Dale is a Tenured Associate Professor of Deaf Studies at Utah Valley University and an attorney advocating for the rights of persons who are Deaf. He consults and presents nationally on both interpreting and legal topics, including: The Physiology of Interpreting; The Physics of Processing Time; Cohesion and Orphans in Interpretation; Legal Rights of Individuals with Disabilities: Law, Deafness and Personhood; Vote: The Power is in Your Hands; Making the ADA Effective for the Deaf Community; and Serving the Client Who is Deaf. Dale recently received a favorable decision from the 9th Circuit Court making Section 504 more accessible to persons who are Deaf (See Ervine v. Desert View Regional Medical Center). Dale has advised NAD, the Organizing Board of the 2007 Deaflympic Games and the Organizing Board for Deaf Studies, Today!

Note from Uncle Dale: Sanity or How Can I Miss You If You Won’t Go Away!

There are those who may say I am ill equipped to write on a subject like keeping your mind right. I am the first to agree. Yet here we are!

Now, I am not talking about any sort of clinical diagnosis. I’m not a doctor, nor do I play one on tv.

I’m also not a Saneist. I know many people who have had a label stapled to them that identifies them as existing, in a mental health sense, outside society’s acceptable lines. Many of these friends I believe are just way ahead of the curve in their perspective on how to approach life in general. Who is to say they are not right?

No, I’m talking about how you keep your head in the game for the long term as an interpreter, without burning out.

In a previous Note I admitted that sometimes you just have to walk away. But, there are things you can do short of that to keep your mind, body and spirit in healthy alignment.

First, admit to yourself that this is a highly stressful profession.  It is.  you are not weak of body or spirit by admitting this.  We often stand with our Clients at the high and low points of thier lives and that takes a toll.

Second, remember that interpreting in not who you are, it’s what you do.  See Rule 7 https://uncledalesrulesforinterpreters.wordpress.com/2017/03/10/rule-7/

If you make your whole identity “interpreting” then you are at the mercy of forces outside your control. You will have bad appointments. Everyone has a bad appointment sometime or another. If you tie your self-worth to how well you interpret what happens when that bad appointment tries to crush you?

Third, You have to have outlets and interest outside of interpreting. Some should even be outside the Deaf community completely! And before you (Deaf or hearing) think that is me saying that there is something about the Deaf community hearing people must escape, remember that even Deaf people go fly fishing sometimes. Hearing or Deaf we all skip the family party sometimes. It is possible to have a great deal of love and connection with a culture, or family or group or even a person and really just need to spend some time away from them every once in a while. As Aunt SuperTam tells me on a fairly regular basis, “how can I miss you if you won’t go away.” These are little escapes. Mini-vacations for your soul.

How do I escape? Well, recently I have started telling stories at regional storytelling festivals:

Last year I won the title of Utah’s Biggest Liar at the Timpanogos Storytelling Festival. I tell mostly stories about my adventures with my Grandfather who was a large animal veterinarian.

Every so often I try out for a play and do a little community theatre:

Boris Kolenkhov in “You Can’t Take It With You”

Cornelius Hackl in “Hello Dolly”

And just this week I got the role of Snoopy in “You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown” playing in June.

It’s a little escape. A little outlet. A little mini-vacation time outside the world of interpreting. The great part is this “little time away” from the Deaf Community makes me applicate and love it even more when I return. I am more focused, more engaged and it helps me keep my head and perspective in tune. It keeps me sane, you could say.

Maybe AuntSuperTam is on to something. Maybe you can’t miss it if you don’t go away.

Rule 495

Terms for things all interpreters understand.

Morgan Freeman: when you narrate the appointment as much as interpret it (most common among VRS interpreters, but we all do it), as in:

I had to straight-up Morgan Freeman for an hour! I just kept saying, “The Client is reading the paper you just gave him so you’ll have to wait for him to look up,” or “The door is closed so the Client will not understand the instructions you are giving on how to collect a ‘clean’ urine sample.”

VRS Interpreters: “The Caller is talking to someone off screen,” or “there are now two people on the screen,” or “the Caller just walked away…”

Rule 468

First, voices whispering in the dark. Love the dramatic effect! But, any chance we could keep the interpreters’ light on? Just for the times you want the Deaf audience members, who bought tickets, to understand the dialogue. Even if it’s voices whispering in the dark.

Uncle Dale Asks for a Moment of Your Time

It’s an indulgence if you would be so kind.

Do you remember this guy:

This is Chip (that is his real name! It’s on his driver’s license and everything). He and I work together as often as we can. If you ever get the chance to work with Chip I would highly recommend it.

If you do get the chance to work with Chip you will soon realize why I like him as a person and as a professional. Plus there is the added benefit of our names.

Say or Sign them out loud. Go ahead. Yep THAT!

So! In my last post I told you my family and I went on a trip. One place we stopped is DisneyWorld. Look what Aunt SuperTam bought:

These are socks. Why two pair? Because I’m only keeping the Dale socks. Merry Christmas Chip!!!!

UD