Note from Uncle Dale: The Wheel? I’m Pretty Sure That’s Already Been Invented.

Hello! It feels good to be back and typing furiously with my thumbs!

I love working with teams. I always learn something by watching how another interpreter handles tricky linguistic issues or does the simple things better.

There is no such thing as plagiarism when it comes to interpreting. No interpreter has a copyright on a great way to interpret “that” no matter what “that” is. If you see something you can use then collect it for your toolbox and use it when you need it.

Stop looking at other interpreters and wishing you had the skills that he or she has. Figure out what they are doing, that you wish you were doing, and start trying to incorporate what you observe into your own work.

“It’s that simple,” you ask?

Well, yes. And no.

It’s as simple as opening your eyes and ears and mind. But, so many things block our ability to observe and incorporate breakthrough skills we see into our own work.

Number one barrier? Petty jealousy.

As I get older I have to admit more and more that the next generation of interpreters will be better at this than I could ever have hoped to be in my lifetime.

And that is a great thing. They should be better. Their skills and abilities should pass me by. That each generation of interpreters accomplishes more than the previous is good for the Deaf community and good for the profession.

It’s also to be expected because they have something to help them develop their skills that I never had. They have me.

I don’t mean me personally (though I try to do my share in the classroom) I mean they have the wealth of understanding contained within collective experience of my generation like I had the benefit of the giants who came before me. The next generation should build from the beginning on the solid foundation of the mistakes that taught me and crafted me into the interpreter I am today. They should not need to make the same mistakes I made to learn the same lessons I learned (though that is sometimes unavoidable). They should start above the noise and confusion by standing on my shoulders. This leaves them open to learn their own lessons, deeper mysteries of language and culture that I never got to because I was dealing with the lessons this profession had for my generation.

I have grown used to being the one who dazzled by reason the ease with which I handle difficult concepts. It is sometimes hard for me to admit that this young interpreter has produced a more clear concise interpretation than I.

It’s hard to admit that I still have things to learn. And harder to admit that this kid has something to teach me.

But that is the beauty of this profession, if we are willing to learn there is always something we can learn.

Our best resource is the Deaf community. If I have one lesson to pass on to working interpreters it’s this-prosody.

Take every opportunity to observe how people who are Deaf make themselves understood. How do they indicate the beginning of a new idea? How do native ASL users show the end of an idea? I’m not talking about grammar or vocabulary, I’m talking about dynamic functional punctuation.

When we look and really see how people who are Deaf transition between ideas or indicate turn taking or emphasize a point or refer back to a past idea… any myriad of structural linguistic guides that they produce with subtle shifts and facial expressions so naturally that these markers are almost imperceptible in flow of communication, but without which there would be no flow of communication, we quickly see how ham fisted and awkward our attempts to accomplish the same thing using crass signs are.

It’s art.

It’s beautiful.

The economy of movement is inspiring. A native user can often accomplish with a nose wrinkle a meaning takes an interpreter 5-7 signs to produce in equity.

If we look and really see the structural perfection of it all we cannot help but say, “why aren’t I doing that? I should be doing that!”

And we can do “that.” We can do “that” if we are willing to see, process what we’ve seen and incorporate it into our work through applied practice.

There are always lessons to learn. There are always opportunities to be better at what we do, if we are willing to be taught.

Rule 734

You had a bad day, that doesn’t mean you’re a bad interpreter.

This may apply to you today.

Remember this when it applies to your team tomorrow.

Rule 700

Don’t hang a rough appointment around the neck of your struggling team like a scarlet letter.

There are any number of reasons they are having a hard day. Some are obvious, others are not.

Step up for them today.

Because someday it will be your turn.

Note from Uncle Dale: IEPs from RID Views

#uncledalesviews

https://www.rid.org/2018/11/a-note-from-uncle-dale/

Random Thoughts From Uncle Dale: Interpreterisms

https://youtu.be/13DvXLdr_H4

You know them. You’ve said them. Usually with the same vocal inflection employed by Bob the Tomato when he says, “like butter on a bald monkey.”

Interpreterisms are always best when it is just possible that they are accurate interpretations.

Some of the best I’ve heard:

“It takes a mighty big dog to weigh a ton.” (It was said with such conviction).

(Misunderstanding a local sign for ‘prefer’) “aaaaannnnnd then a squirrel jumped up and bit me on the head?”

“I couldn’t wear the ice cream home or my mother would know I’d been with a boy.”

“It’s a kind of, it’s a thing where, it’s, it’s, it’s a, I don’t know what it is.”

“And then I wondered if I… swallowed the… Er… ate the… soap?”

What are your favorites?

Rule 669

Eventually every interpreter will take one, for the Team. Today it was my turn. You’re welcome. Tomorrow it may be yours. Thank you in advance.

Rule 661

If your team is walking backwards while interpreting for a tour, it is your responsibility to make sure they don’t trip over anything, fall down any stairs or smash into any walls.

Rule 641

Teamed today with an interpreter who graduated from my program:

“You totally stole that interpretation right from an example I gave in class!

Good for you!

That means you paid attention in class!”