Rule 647

Dear interpreting student who is struggling right now:

I need you to believe in you, because it’s lonely out here believing in you all by myself.

If I thought you were hopeless I would have no compunction about encouraging you to explore exciting careers in the food service industry.

Have we had that discussion?

No?

Then it’s time to get back to work.

Rule 641

Teamed today with an interpreter who graduated from my program:

“You totally stole that interpretation right from an example I gave in class!

Good for you!

That means you paid attention in class!”

Rule 639

Dear Interpreter That I Mentor:

Don’t try to be “more like me.” The world already has a “me.”

The world needs a “you.” Be “more like you!”

I will pass along all that is “me” and you will build onto it all that is “you.” If I do my job well “you” will be a better interpreter than I ever was or could ever hope to be.

Because the future needs a “you.”

Rule 631

“If you can just do this quick job for us we will work out pay with you later,” or, “Don’t worry we’ll take care of you,” is just a Hearing Client’s way of saying, “we’re not going to pay you.”

It’s kinda a Labor Day Rule.

Rules for Media Interviews

Thank you Timpfest and the Deseret News.

https://www.deseretnews.com/article/900030152/asl-interpreters-have-to-think-fast-on-their-feet-with-their-hands-at-utahs-timpanogos-storytelling-fest.html

Now…

years ago I was interviewed by The Today Show. A very wise attorney told me, “prepare your talking points before you start. Never rely on the interviewer to give them to you.”

Check.

“The Media never prints what you mean, only what you say.”

Yep!

“No matter how much you enjoy the story (article) someone somewhere will be offended by it.”

With those bits of wisdom in mind:

1. My wife is way ahead of you in pointing out that the article is kinda “The Uncle Dale Show!” It makes me laugh that they found the video of my Biggest Liar win and linked it (that is Chip interpreting);

2. They wanted to do an article about the interpreters, I suggested they interview a person who is Deaf for a cultural perspective (love Kristi!! She is fantastic!) and they still quoted me on Deaf culture (the quote is actually something I told the writer as an idea of the kinds of things to ask Kristi! Oh well);

3) That last paragraph? I was specifically discussing storytellers who use colloquial language (Read it again with that caveat in mind); and,

4) It’s a fun article, it won’t change the world but it may make it more fun.

In the end. I needed a little fun right now. Hope it makes you smile too.

Rule 625

When you find a video of that conference five years ago where everyone said you totally rocked the ASL-to-English interpretation for that Deaf presenter, remember- that video is a cursed object.

Do not open it! Don’t even touch it!

Because, inside it is your best work, from five years ago.

And you will see it is good, you know, for five years ago.

I mean it’s nowhere near the level of your best work today.

But it’s still pretty good.

Well sure, you’ll think, there are a couple of word choices you would not have made today, but it’s acceptable work.

Except, now you notice that odd voice inflection, but it’s fine, mostly, I mean for five years ago.

Of course, you did seem to say “ummmm” like, A LOT. But it’s not bad, really.

And wow, you realize that actually vocalized that rhetorical question literally without adjusting it to its “Hearing” equivalent. You would never make that choice today.

But maybe you were tired?

(Why, you wonder, didn’t you hand it off to your team, what were you thinking?)

CURSED OBJECT! DO NOT RELEASE THAT PLAGUE UPON YOURSELF.

By the way, your work was great. It’s not worse than you remember, you’re just better than you were!

UD

Rule 622

Find your happy place.

Conference Presenter: It’s a very simple exercise in self-awareness. I will talk you through it while I show you how it’s done (pushes the microphone into the platform interpreter’s hand while muttering, “hold this for a sec…”)

NOW I’LL SPEAK LOUDLY! OK MAKE SURE YOUR HANDS ARE FREE FOR THIS. CAN YOU HEAR ME IN THE BACK? (stage whisper to the interpreter, “hold that microphone near my mouth please…”)