Rule 660

Make sure you turn off the “Send My Location” function on your cell phone when texting from a job site.

(Holy crap! That’s like a real RULE! How did that get in here?)

Note from Uncle Dale: Use of Space as an Analysis Tool Or Arts And Crafts For Understanding.

Hi. Uncle Dale here.

It’s been a while since I gave you a skill development tool. This one requires supplies, but it’s worth it.

Listen to the text below:

Scary?

My class thought so (apparently, I am “mean” even though I let them play with toys… wait for it, I’ll explain).

I will admit the point was to shake them up a little… but in a good way, a kind and loving boot to the brain, tap you lightly with a sledge-hammer kind of way.

Before you decide that you really just don’t like me, let me tell you a secret.

If you understand one term, just one single key word, in this text, you can use that as the anchor to simplify the whole meaning, by seeing how all the pieces attach to that key concept and fit together physically. If you start from that key term, then in your head you can work through the meaning of rest of the text.

In other words, by using space properly and according to its linguistic function in ASL you can, on the fly, connect things you don’t understand to things you do understand and voila! You understand it all.

If! And only if, you understand the key term.

For the text above the term is: “Fields.”

If you understand what the term “Fields” means in the context of this computer program then you can visualize everything that proceeds from the core concept of “Fields.” If you can visualize it, and then put it in its proper space, its meaning will become clear to you as you use the space in the linguistically appropraite manner for ASL.

Let me say that again.

If you use space in the correct way it will help you analyze the meaning of the information you are processing even if it sound too complex to comprehend.

In the case of the text above you just have to see in your head how software programs like this work, as if they existed in and occupied space in the real world. The easiest way to teach yourself to do that involves Arts and Crafts.

And it all starts with the key to understanding your starting place; “Fields.”

Got it?

“NO, WAIT,” you cry, “I ABSOLUTELY DON’T ‘GOT IT!'”

Ok, calm down. let me back up.

First, relax.  I know that showing up at an appointment where they say, “ok, were going to train you on the new accounting software today…” makes you want to yell, “I DON’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT ACCOUNTING OR ACCOUNTING PROGRAMS! I SMELL TOAST!” and collapse to the floor.

But before you abandon all hope let me give you some persective.

They did not say, “today we are going to discuss accounting programs,” They said, “today we’re training on the new program.”

That means there is an old program.

That means there is a strong possibility that your Client is already familiar with computerized accounting programs generally because they used the “old program.” At least more familiar than you are. Never underestimate the benefit of a client who knows more about the topic than you do. It covers a multitude of sins.

Second, you know what accounting means so you have the bare minimum of a schema, and that is all you need here.

So let’s get back to “Fields.”

In computer programs “Fields” are places where you put variable values of information in order to complete a sequence.

In other words they are the blank places you type stuff into in order to tell the computer to do something with the words or numbers you typed.

Think of a Google search.

The place on the Google search page you type the words “Does this look infected to you” before you push the “search” button? That is a “Field.”

Once you have typed, “what’s a good place to eat on a second date” or “what is Uncle Dale smoking” into the “Field” and pushed “search” (or I’m Feeling Lucky if you’re a reckless adventurer) the information you typed into the “Field” tells Google to do something; go out to the web and fetch things with words that match this stuff I just typed in this box.

So, how does that possibly help you analyze for meaning?

Like this:

Although software programs are just ones and zeros, if you, the interpreter, can see the software’s functions in your mind as physical locations, occupying a three-dimensional landscape (think of the movie TRON if that helps), then you can organize all that seemingly complex jumble of data points into usable locations within your own interpreting space.

Once you’ve done that then it’s just a matter of referring to the objects that you have appropriately placed within your signing space to establish what Carol Patrie calls, “relationships” (logical, temporal, and physical).

Relationships show the order of, or connections between, the landmarks you established within the three-dimensional “computer program space” you created. You got this!

You will eventually want to do this in your head. But it is easier to start out by doing in real space.

Ok. So here is a little exercise help you take it out of your head, put it in real space, so you can put it back in your head.

In order to play along at home you will need the following:

A good sized long table;

Two wire framed office baskets;

Three different colors of string, yarn or tape:

A set of large post-notes;

A set of small post-it notes (at least three different colors); and,

Markers.

Here is how you play:

Before there was Direct or Private messaging there was text and before that e-mail and before that faxes and before that intra-office mail and before that pneumatic tubes.

Pneumatic tubes? Think of the drive-up window at a bank, or an old movie. You put the stuff in the tube and seal it (papers, money, pens… that kind of thing). Each tube in this case goes not only to a different room in the office, but to the desks of specific people. One set of tubes connects to every desk, another only to select persons.

We could use text or email for the visual but pneumatic tunes are easier to visualize and, let’s be honest, sort of steam punk and fun.

So, pneumatic tubes.

Imagine a room in an office building with the where the pneumatic tubes start.

At one end of the table in front of you place the wire “in/out” baskets, side by side. Using the 3×5 cards and a sharpie (marker) label both baskets “Payroll Fields” and label one Flat Rate and the other Calculated Rate.

At various places on the table place 3×5 with Employee 1, Employee 2, Employee 3… up-to at most Employee 6. It’s easiest if you tape them down.

Now take the different colors of string or tape. Using one color of tape or string for each in/out basket connect each in/out basket to All Employees and using different colors of tape or string connect each in/out basket to Some Employees.

These are the pneumatic tubes. Some things put in the in/out basket will be sent to all the employees and somethings will only be sent to select individual employees.

These baskets are “Fields.” Some of the things you put in the “Fields” will be attached to all employees and some of the things you put in the basket will connect to only some employees.

Using tape make a square on the table around both in/out baskets. Label that square “employee defaults window.”

Ok ready, replay the audio above (For some reason when I imbedded this the captions don’t work-hearing interpreters and CDI’s should do this exercise together until I can post a transcript) and see if what you have on the table helps you follow the narrative more clearly.

Now every detail you need is not here yet. But I have given you the start. For example:

You will eventually need two 3×5 card labeled “maintain employees and sales reps” at the place where all the “pneumatic tube” hook to the in/out baskets.

When you get to the payroll taxes you will need two 3×5 cards, one labeled State Tax and one labeled Federal Tax. Where do these formulae live? In the wire in/out basket market Calculated Rate.

Oh oh we have a problem. What if we subscribe to the Peachtree Tax Update Service? Where does that live? Take a 3×5 card and write Peachtree Tax Update Service and place it… somewhere else. It does not live in the software program-you get it from the Peachtree server. Set the 3×5 card somewhere and then, using your tape or string connect it to the Calculated Rate basket on the opposite side from the “pneumatic tubes” to remind yourself that this is coming in from the outside.

If you get really ambitious you can write Peach-tree Maintained on the tape or make a label for the string coming into the back of the Calculated Rate in/out basket.

Now the text above. Anything you put in the in/out baskets travels along the string or tape (pneumatic tubes) to impact the paychecks of the employees at the other end–some will impact all employees and some will only be sent out to select employees.

If this all seems confusing or too much, that is because you are reading this Note and not actually doing the arts and crafts project.

Do the project.

It will freak you out just a little how much more you understand if you see this all existing in actual physical space.

The use of physical space is a component of ASL grammar, but correctly applied it is also a functional analysis tool.

I make students draw pictures, play with dolls and Fisher-Price Little Town sets and a whole host of other physical exercises so they can visualize Physical, Temporal and Logical Relationships.

If you are just starting out or if you have 25 years under your belt, try coupling your practice with an arts and crafts project like this.

You will be amazed at how much it helps you understand if you are willing to take a minute on playing with dolls or just good old fashioned arts and crafts.

Rule 628

Every Freelance Interpreter has rolled the dice and accepted an appointment that they know is long and boring because at least half the time it cancels last minute so they still get paid.

Rule 624

Find your happy place.

Security: I can’t let you into the convention without a pass.

Interpreter: I’m the Sign Language Interpreter.

Security: Oh, they told me to tell you that your credentials are at the Information Booth in the Main Hall.

Interpreter: Ok thanks, I’ll go and get them.

Security: Sorry. I can’t let you in without a pass.

Rule 620

VRS Interpreter: Hello my name is [Name] and I am a VRS Interpreter.

Support Group: Hi [Name]!

VRS Interpreter: Um. Well. I’ve been a CA for about four years now and I never thought I had a problem, then, the other day the call was answered by a PBX system, you know:

“…if you know the extension of the party you wish to reach you may dial it at any time, otherwise please choose from the following:

Press One for…”

And I realized I had memorized the number sequence to get from the trunk line to a live operator for that company.

And the Social Security Administration.

And to get to the Customer Service Department at four different cell phone providers.

And six hospitals and nine doctors offices, only one of which is in my State.

And Human Resources for the US Post Office.

Oh, and for Costco and, like, seven other businesses.

I can’t even call my children by their correct names half the time.

That’s when I knew I needed help…

Note From Uncle Dale: ASL to Spoken “Hearing.”

The new school year begins and I get to teach one of my favorite courses this semester (I know I say that a lot, and every time I say it, it is true!), ASL to Spoken English or as I like to call it “Spoken Hearing.”

Yay!

This is the first in what is meant to be a two-part course of study. The second being “Visual Linguistic Analysis.”

Now, I say meant to be because ideally you should take ASL to Spoken English (Hearing) first and then Visual Linguistic Analysis. But you can take either as a stand alone class because each focuses on different skill sets.

Many of my students will tell you if you take them both, in the expected order, you can learn to interpret from ASL to Spoken English and make it pretty and work with the confidence that the Deaf community should, but rarely does, expect!

Think about it. How many members of the Deaf community expect an interpreter with whom they have never worked to have the skills to understand ASL let alone interpret it into English at a level they can trust; I mean trust at a level where they just feel free to say what they want without constantly checking on the interpreter?

That is my goal for students who graduate from the program I oversee; to be known for their strong ASL analysis skills. If a Client knows their interpreter came from my program I want them to immediately feel free to express themselves in a way that is natural, not in a way they hope the interpreter understands.

But, as the title of my future memoir says, I digress.

If you want to learn to work from ASL to Spoken English your first hurdle is to be comfortable speaking in your own first language, getting used to the sound of your own voice.

My students will tell you I rarely use the term spoken English in class. I say “Spoken Hearing,” as in, “say that in hearing.” Because the only place “proper English” exists is in texts books about English.

Step one: get over the sound of your own voice, in hearing.

Stand up and say concepts, ideas, and words that are not your own, out loud, in front of other people.

Think of the movie “inception.” Your brain will rebel against saying words or concepts out loud that do not originate from within your brain. Specifically when phrased in first person. It will totally fight you!

So, we start with poetry. Long form poetry. Yes, I mean we read long form poetry out loud.

I know. You are out there saying, “POETRY? Not a fan!” And that, it turns out, is the reason it works so well as a teaching tool. Your brain must deal with familiar words in an unfamiliar format.

Moreover, I believe this world can be divided into people who love poetry and people who don’t know who Robert Service is.

Here. Enjoy this (I’m not kidding, I’ll wait…)

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/46647/the-ballad-of-blasphemous-bill

Here is what I need you to do. Read it out loud and don’t be constrained by the rules you learned in school. Read it like you were telling a story. A story of someone who agreed to take on a job that they did not think through, and how they did the job… but not exactly in the way Bill hired them to do it.

Find the meaning. Find the story, not just the words that the story is built from. Most important? GET IT OUT OF YOUR MOUTH.

Get it out of your mouth in front of another person. Get over the sound of your own voice!

Step Two: GET IT OUT OF YOUR MOUTH!

If you want to learn how to work from ASL to “Hearing” the step after poetry is to work with something dynamic. Something that vanishes (because the words on the page are always there any time you look). So we move on to cartoons.

Old ones.

Old black and white Betty Boop cartoons work fantastically well for this.

Have someone put their back to the screen, turn the sound off and, using full sentences, describe this:

Remember you cannot say things like “the dog walked over to the table…” because, which dog? What table?

If you give too little detail it makes no sense. Too much detail? You lose the thread of the story.

Say what you see. Even if what you see is impossible (how did you handle the fire truck going around a corner?).

Most important? GET IT OUT OF YOUR MOUTH.

Step Three: we move on to silent movies. Dealing with implied and sometimes stated dialogue. How do you handle conversations? How do you keep participants separate?

“WAIT! WAIT UNCLE DALE!” I hear you saying, “what about ASL? We are three assignments in to this semester and you have not even touched on ASL!”

Nope. You still have a couple more steps before we get there.

These are the skills you need to master before we clutter up your head with the process of interpreting from one language to another.

Think about it this way. If you can’t clearly and with full sentences describe what happens when Pudgy the Dog runs into the burning building how would you possibly do it if we laid the mental process of interpreting on top of it?

Build the foundational skills first, get over the sound of your voice, GET IT OUT OF YOUR MOUTH, in complete sentences, then move on.

Wax on/Wax off.

Paint the fence.

Sand the floor.

Rule 613

It’s easier to process the message without all the alarms in your head going, “WHOOP WHOOP YOU ARE GOING TO FORGET THIS WHOOP WHOOP!”

(Who thought it was a good idea to install those?)

The Wit and Wisdom of Dana!

Thanks Dana!