Rule 614

If we chose where our bodies lived in the same way we choose the memories where our minds live, then most of us would just keep renewing the lease on the worst apartment we ever had.

The Wit and Wisdom of Ryan.

Thanks Ryan! (I will use your full names if you give them to me!!! Grin)

Rule 612

You learn a great deal about medical interpreting by being a patient.

The same must be true about interpreting for the police, but don’t.

Rule 611

When a Doctor’s Office tells a Deaf person, “you have to bring your own interpreter,” I just want to ask the name of the wheelchair user they required to build that wheelchair-ramp in front of their building.

Rule 603

Terms For Things All Interpreters Understand:

Reverse Tennis:

When you are working from ASL-to-Spoken English and the Client suddenly signs, “YES, EXACTLY YOU RIGHT POINT GOOD,” you have no idea what “point” a different Deaf person, who is behind you, made, and let’s face it “TRAIN-GONE,” but you still reflexively turn your head toward the second Deaf person and, whoops, “TRAIN-GONE” what the Client is saying NOW, so you quickly snap your eyes back to the Client only to realize, by the look on the Client’s face, that the Deaf person behind you is making another comment…

Rule 597

Things Uncle Dale may have done that you probably should not (on-going):

Not ten seconds on the scene…

Police Officer: We’re just going to arrest them all and let them sort it out at the station. I don’t think we need you to interpret any of this.

UD: I don’t think you need arrest any of these people, but in the end we are both destined to disappoint the other.

Police Officer: (stern look) *blink* *blink*

UD: Where are my Clients?

Rule 596

Dear VRI Interpreter:

Watch your sight-lines or clean your room!

The Client should not know it’s Monday because that pair of “day of the week” panties is missing from the clothes strewn about the room behind you.

Thank you Jared Allebest