Rule 739

If you ever want to know how much embarrassment you can take, interpret for a mediocre comedian who needs an easy target to save his act.

Random Thoughts From Uncle Dale: The ADA 29 Years and Counting.

A couple of weeks ago Shelby Hintze, a television producer and the daughter of my cousin, asked me to review the script of a segment she was planning for a local Sunday talk show discussing the ADA’s 29th anniversary.

See if you can spot the part that I helped write, Grin.

https://youtu.be/FtMyIQU35r0

(The prepared video transcript. I am working on a transcript for the live portion.)

Voice of Shelby Hintze

According to the 2010 Census—nearly 20 percent of the U.S. population has some sort of disability. That’s one in five people in this country. As the Baby Boomer generation ages—that number is expected to grow a lot.

Despite the sheer numbers, the unemployment rate for disabled Americans is nearly twice the rate of their able-bodied peers. But historically, that’s an improvement. 29 years ago—our country took a big step in the civil rights of disabled Americans when President George H. W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act—also known as the ADA.

Activists argued that people with disabilities were not as disabled by their bodies as they were by their environment. They had a right to access all the services of their able-bodied peers. King Jordan, the first deaf president of Gallaudet University, said, “We’re not asking for any favors. … We’re simply asking the same rights and equality any other American has.” In what is described as the biggest catalyst to the bill’s signing 60 activists left their wheelchairs and dragged themselves up the 83 steps to the U-S Capitol, in what’s called The Capitol Crawl. The bill was signed four months later. Since 2000, 181 countries have signed disability civil rights laws inspired by the ADA.

When we think of the ADA, we often think of improving access for wheelchair users. But it’s more than that. It offers protections for the deaf community, people who are blind, people with chronic illnesses.

One of the biggest misconceptions about the ADA is how it is enforced. The law is mostly complaint based. For example, while new buildings are required to have things like ramps, accessible restrooms, and Braille on signs—there is no one who checks these regulations and must be solved through mediation or court.  

For example–Under Title III of the ADA, Deaf people are promised “effective communication” but that really isn’t defined by the law. So if a Deaf person goes to a doctor for example, the doctor gets to decide what “effective communication” means. In this case, it could mean the doctor decides writing notes back and forth is enough–instead of using a certified sign language interpreter, which the Deaf patient may want. The Deaf person cannot do anything legally unless they can prove the communication was ineffective. That can be very hard to prove. If they do win the case, the Deaf person is then only entitled to another appointment with that same doctor, this time with an interpreter. Title III does not allow someone monetary damages beyond legal fees.

Just recently—a Utah family made national headlines after they were denied service at an Ogden restaurant because one of the children used a service animal. That was illegal. But outside of court, there is no way to actually make people follow the law.

The ADA did a lot to change the world for disabled people. But for many activists, it is just the beginning.

Rule 737

“What do ‘the Deaf’ think about X?”

Hold on.

Wait.

Nope. Sorry. My mind link to every person on earth who is Deaf is not working.

Uncle Dale at Emergency Management Interpreter Training in Atlanta, GA

I have been invited to present at EMIT.

I will be the evening “infotainment” on June 12, 2019 from 7-9.

The title of my “lectshow” is:

Having No Idea What I’m Doing Has Never Stopped Me Before

It will be a great evening! Can’t wait to see you there!

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.eventbrite.com/e/emergency-management-interpreter-training-emit-2019-tickets-53189515272/amp

Rule 736

“We don’t have a budget for Interpreters,” is not a defense.

The proper response is, “well nothing is in the budget until you put it there. This oversight will make finding the money for Interpreters difficult, but you’ll figure it out.

On the bright side, now you will know how much to budget for Interpreters in the future so you’ll never have to worry about it again.”

Rule 735

Dear Deaf Client,

You know that Code of Professional Conduct forbids me offering personal opinions.

So…

While we are waiting for your job interview at a clothing store I will hold your purse as you try on clothes, but I will not tell you which outfit looks better.